Press

Recently Princess Anne visited us to open our new unit at the Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London. Some of the SABRE study participants joined us on the day.

The video news clip is taken from a BBC London News broadcast of July 17th 2008 and gives an idea of the background to the SABRE Study. Two of our study participants kindly agreed to be filmed undergoing some of the tests and talking about their experiences.

 

Royal Visit

Recently Princess Anne visited us to open our new unit at the Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London. Some of the SABRE study participants joined us on the day.

ICS_PrincessRoyal_0071ICS_PrincessRoyal_0081ICS_PrincessRoyal_0101
ICS_PrincessRoyal_0114ICS_PrincessRoyal_0063ICS_PrincessRoyal_0068

Some more information on the UCL web site.

Study finds that South Asian people have higher rates of age-related disability than other ethnic groups

We have had a paper published in the journal, PLoS One, showing that South Asian people were significantly more likely to experience objective and self-reported disability in older age than Europeans.   This excess risk could not be explained by demographic, behavioural and chronic disease risk factors.  In contrast, a reduced risk of the most severe measure of disability was observed in the African Caribbean group, compared with the European sample.

This is the first study in the UK to examine disability rates in different ethnic groups.  We now need to develop our knowledge about the causes of disability across different groups and understand whether beliefs about healthy aging and functioning in older age contribute to these disability levels.

Here is a link to the published paper: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0045602

Our new paper finds twice the risk of developing diabetes in South Asians and African Caribbean participants

Our  paper published in the journal Diabetes Care found that the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes before the age of 80 is roughly double for the South Asian and African Caribbean people in our study as compared with white Europeans.

Our results also showed an interesting difference between the women and the men. The higher risk for the women can be explained in terms of insulin resistance and greater waist fat measured 20 years earlier, but those factors only explained a small part of the excess risk for the men.  More research is needed into risk factors which may act at different stages of life in order to fully explain why South Asian, African and African Caribbean men and women are at such high risk of developing diabetes.

There were a lot of news stories and online reports about these study results.  Here are links to a few of them:

Research Staff

Our research staff in the clinic include nurses, physiologists, radiographers, and research assistants. Elena, Suzanne, Siana, Lorna, Innocent and April are pictured below.
Elena ChikunovaSuzanne WilliamsSiana Jones
Lorna SmithInnocent BverkerwaApril McGowan